Investment Strategy

2017’s top 10 investment reads

Another year is nearly over. As usual, it feels like it’s flown by (that’s my middle age showing). Last week I took a look back at 2017 (see here), and also what to look out for in 2018 (see here). Today I want to highlight some of OfWealth’s most popular articles of 2017, either in case you missed them or because you’d like to have another look.

Here’s the top 10 from 2017, in no particular order:

  1. The country that’s banned its own money” looked at the ongoing war on cash, and how it’s getting harder and harder to use paper money.
  2. Why I never trade stock options” examined these complicated financial derivatives, and why private investors are highly unlikely to make money from them (despite the claims of people that promote them).
  3. How do you choose a broker?” looked at the kinds of fees and commissions charged by brokers, and what you need to think about when choosing your own broker.
  4. The best places to own stocks” highlighted how emerging market stocks have outperformed, and are likely to continue to do so in future, given their higher economic growth trajectories.
  5. Warning: these housing bubbles are bigger than 2006” looked at how ultra low interest rates have ignited huge new housing bubbles in many countries around the world.
  6. Crisis bargains in today’s investment markets” investigated where you can buy stocks at knock-down prices. Stocks priced for a crisis usually turn out to be the best investments in future, as the crisis passes and prices recover.
  7. Why Tesla Inc. stock is clearly overpriced” analysed whether one of the current crop of most-hyped stocks makes any sense at the current price. Even on generous assumptions, the answer is a clear “no”. (Note: it’s fallen modestly since then, and remains richly priced.)
  8. The crypto craze continues” looked at the unfolding bubble in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. As it turns out, the bubble got even bigger, with the price of bitcoin almost tripling since it was written in mid-November (only just over one month ago!).
  9. The world’s cheapest stock market” looked at why valuation really matters for future investor profits, and identified the cheapest country stock market in the world (which, despite this, has also outperformed the US market in the long run).
  10. The S&P 500 is more than twice its trend line” examined how the expensive US stock market is way above where you’d expect it to be, set in a historical context. This means that US stocks are likely to deliver weak future returns to investors, at best. And that risks are much higher than usual.

This is just a brief selection out of over 100 articles published during the year. I’d like to remind you that you’ll find so much more on the OfWealth website. There’s something for everyone who’s interested in the world of investment.

If you click on the “Articles” tab, you can use the “Categories” or “Topics” menu options to search for articles that cover your areas of interest.

Thank you for reading OfWealth. Look out for much more about the world of investment – whether it’s stocks, bonds, gold, real estate or anything else – during 2018 and beyond.

Stay tuned OfWealthers,

Rob Marstrand

robmarstrand@ofwealth.com

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Rob is the founder of OfWealth, a service that aims to explain to private investors, in simple terms, how to maximise their investment success in world markets. Before that he spent 15 years working for investment bank UBS, the world’s largest wealth manager and stock trader with headquarters in Switzerland. During that time he was based in London, Zurich and Hong Kong and worked in many countries, especially throughout Asia. After that he was Chief Investment Strategist for the Bonner & Partners Family Office for four years, a project set up by Agora founder Bill Bonner that focuses on successful inter-generational wealth transfer and long term investment. Rob has lived in Buenos Aires, Argentina for the past eight years, which is the perfect place to learn about financial crises.

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